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 Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY), a key member of the House Democratic Leadership, Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY), the ranking Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee, and Rep. Ted Deutch (D-FL), the ranking Democrat on the Middle East Subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee each released statements outlining their positions against the agreement.)

Aug 6, 2015 Israel Commentary ‏@Israelcomment 5h5 hours ago
Sen. Chas Schumer:  “The genuine risk that Iran will use the nuclear agreement to pursue its nefarious goals is too great. Therefore, I will vote to disapprove”

Israel Minster of Foreign Affairs (MFA) Newsletter

Redacted from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s address to the Jewish Federations of North America:

August 5, 2015

The nuclear deal with Iran doesn’t block Iran’s path to the bomb. It actually paves Iran’s path to the bomb. It gives Iran two paths to the bomb. Iran can get to the bomb by keeping the deal or Iran could get to the bomb by violating the deal.

“I want to talk with you about three fatal flaws in the nuclear deal with Iran. And I also want to dispel some of the misinformation and, regrettably I have to say, the disinformation about the deal and about Israel’s position. I want to answer some of your important questions.

First, let’s understand how Iran gets to the bomb by keeping the deal. See, the deal allows Iran to maintain and eventually expand a vast and increasingly sophisticated nuclear infrastructure. This infrastructure is unnecessary for civilian nuclear energy, but it’s entirely necessary for nuclear weapons. Astonishingly, the deal gives Iran’s illicit nuclear program full international legitimacy.

If Iran keeps the deal, in a decade or so – at most 15 years – the main restrictions on this vast nuclear program will expire. They’ll just end. The deal’s limitations on the number of centrifuges Iran has and on the quantity of uranium Iran enriches, those restrictions will be lifted. And at that point Iran will be able to produce the enriched uranium for an entire arsenal of nuclear weapons and it could produce that arsenal very quickly. After 15 years, Iran’s breakout time will be practically zero, just a few days.

I think President Obama said as much in an interview with National Public Radio. By keeping the deal Iran will become a threshold nuclear weapons power. The deal does make it harder for Iran to produce one or two nuclear weapons in the short term. But it does so at a terrible price. Because the deal makes it far easier for Iran to build dozens, even hundreds of nuclear weapons in a little over a decade.

Now, 10 to 15 years pass in no time. I think it was like yesterday and I remember this very well, all those preparations for the Y2K bug and the celebrations of the new millennium. That was 15 years ago. It’s a blink of an eye. We’re told that this deal buys us time, but 10 to 15 years is no time at all. So by keeping the deal, Iran can get within a decade or so not just to one bomb, but to many bombs.

But Iran has a second path to the bomb, one that would give it a nuclear weapon in far less time. You see, Iran could violate the deal. And there’s good reason to think that Iran will do so, that it will cheat. They’ve done it before. They’ll do it again.

Now, people don’t really contest that, but they argue that Iran will be prevented from cheating because we’ll have good intelligence and unprecedented inspections. (Huh!)

Well, let me start with intelligence. I have the greatest respect for Israel’s intelligence capabilities. I have the greatest respect for the intelligence services of the United States and Great Britain. But it has to be said honestly. For years none of us discovered the massive underground nuclear facilities Iran was building at Fordo and at Natanz. For years none of us discovered that the Syrians were building a nuclear reactor for plutonium production. So I can tell you from experience, it’s very precarious to bet the deal’s success on intelligence.

Now what about inspections? Neither intelligence nor inspections prevented North Korea from building atomic bombs despite assurances that they wouldn’t be able to do so. And while the deal with Iran allows for ongoing inspections of Iran’s declared sites, what about Iran’s secret nuclear activities? See, under the deal, if a facility is suspected of housing a hidden nuclear activity, inspectors must wait at least 24 days – that’s 24 days! – before getting access to those suspected sites. Not only that, the inspectors must first share with Iran the critical intelligence that led them to suspect these sites in the first place. That’s actually astounding.

Some have said that 24 days is not long enough to conceal evidence of illicit nuclear activity. But as leading experts have pointed out, 24 days is more than enough time to clean up a site of all traces of illicit activity. It’s like the police giving a drug dealer three and a half weeks’ notice before raiding his lab. Believe me, you can flush a lot of nuclear meth down the toilet in 24 days.

So Iran can keep the deal or Iran can cheat on the deal. Either way the deal gives Iran a clear path to the bomb, a difficult path to one or two bombs today and a much easier path to hundreds of bombs tomorrow.

Now, here’s the thing – everybody in the Middle East knows what I’ve just said. And the countries in the region threatened by Iran have already made clear that they will work to develop atomic bombs of their own. So the deal that was supposed to end nuclear proliferation will actually trigger nuclear proliferation. It will trigger an arms race, a nuclear arms race in the Middle East, the most volatile part of the planet. That’s a real nightmare!

Here in Israel, Isaac Herzog, the Leader of the Labor Opposition, the man who ran against me in this year’s election and who works every day in the Knesset to bring down my government, Herzog has said that there is no daylight between us when it comes to the deal with Iran.

I’m asking you all in the US  to rise above partisan politics as we in Israel have risen above it. Judge the deal on its substance and on its substance alone. The more people know about the deal, the more they oppose it. And the more people know about the deal, the more the deal’s supporters try to stifle serious debate. They do so with false claims and efforts to delegitimize criticism.

We face Iran’s terror on three borders. We face tens of thousands of Iranian rockets aimed at all our cities. We face Iran, whose regime repeatedly calls for the destruction of the Jewish state. We face Iran whose terrorist proxies try to kill Jews every day. We know that Iran is not only the leading state sponsor of terrorism, it’s also the leading state sponsor of anti-Semitism.

I don’t oppose this deal because I want war. I oppose this deal because I want to prevent war, and this deal will bring war.It will spark a nuclear arms race in the region and it would feed Iran’s terrorism and aggression. That would make war, perhaps the most horrific war of all, far more likely.

What we do now will affect our lives and the lives of our children and grandchildren – in Israel, in America, everywhere. This is a time to stand up and be counted. Oppose this dangerous deal.

Thank you.

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